IMAGES

Juan Carlos, 22, México, 18 years living in the United States.

    On January 25, Donald Trump signed an executive order to defund sanctuary cities that protect undocumented immigrants. The following day, Miami Mayor Carlos Gimenez, a Cuban refugee, became the first mayor in the country to officially and publicly comply with Trump’s divisive order. He even got a thank you tweet from the president himself: “Strong!”

Juan Carlos along with other activists spent 100 hours—four days—without food, sitting outside the mayor’s office, and sleeping in a local church as a sign of protest to the mayor's desition.

“As an undocumented DACA student, I’ve seen fear enter my community. My parents have so much fear that they don’t want to drive alone. This is an urgent matter that affects lives, families, and security. I joined to show Gimenez I will put my body on the line before my community and my parents are affected and broken up.”

The commission voted 9-3, with one commissioner absent, in support of Gimenez's action to drop sanctuary protection for undocumented immigrants.

Cecy. Mexico. 10 years living in the United States

    After graduating from The New School in New York City, Cecy became Social Justice Development Coordinator at a High School in New Mexico. She is also part of Generation Justice, an organization that trains teens to approach journalism from a social justice and media justice framework.
Carlos. Mexico. 25 years living in the United States
Trinidad. Mexico. 8 years living in the United States

    Teresa came from her native Puebla 8 years ago after her husband got robbed and killed while attending his commercial business. She had to leave her 3 sons that has not seen ever since in order to make ends meet as a domestic worker and send money back home. Taken advantage of her immigration status, she was abused by her employer with poor employment conditions, like extreme long days of work and unreasonable payment. She said that she feels invisible when walking on the streets in New York, and that sometimes cars don’t event stop while she is crossing the streets.
Omar. Mexico. 7 years living in the United States
Milton. Ecuador. 10 years living in the United States

Milton is a day laborer from Queens, NY. Originally from Ecuador, Milton is one of the organizers for New Immigrant Community Empowerment organization. Successfully being part of passing a bill that protects day laborers in the state of New York. Milton participates on educating other undocumented immigrants about their human rights and laws that protects them from harassments and prosecution.
Francisco. Mexico. 9 years living in the United States

    Francisco is part of the new campaign by the organization Laundry Workers Center to improve florist worker’s conditions and wages. These workers that work as florists in Manhattan, submitted to harsh weather conditions such as extreme cold in the winter and extreme hot in the summer. They are also enclosed with gas fumes that keeps the conditions of the flowers but is hazardous to their health.
Jorge. Mexico. 7 years living in the United States

    Jorge works as a dishwasher at a restaurant. He is part of the “Titlanice”campaign, which translates to " Vamos a ganar". For many years, these restaurant workers faced wage theft and abusive working conditions. Now, after intensive training with LWC's Leadership Institute, they are coming together in order to demand better life for themselves and their families.
Ricardo. Mexico. 6 years living in the United States

    Ricardo works as a florist in Manhattan, his situation is that his employer is not fair with his wages and the amount of hours that he works (up to 12 hours straight, most times 7 days of the week) and no vacation days or sick leave, he works outside under harsh weather conditions during the cold winter and the hot summer, and among chemicals to keep the flowers safe but hazardous for humans. Ricardo lives by himself and works hard to send money to his family in Guerrero, Mexico.

Giancarlos. Peru. 14 years living in the United States

    Giancarlos was a leader in the successful fight to gain in-state tuition rates at New Jersey’s public colleges and universities for students like himself who are in the country illegally. And now he is getting his education paid for by Rutgers-Newark, which has awarded him a two-year scholarship worth at least $22,000 to return to his studies.
Jose. Mexico. 7 years living in the United States
Rosanna. Uruguay. 16 years living in the United States

    Rosana is native from Montevideo, Uruguay. She made her way into the United States looking for better opportunities. She is a single mother and works as community organizer. After being a victim of domestic abuse, she founded Women Working Together USA, a group that organize, empower and educate women about their rights on immigration and domestic violence issues.
Claudia. Argentina. 16 years living in the United States
Carlos. Dominican. 10 years living in the United States
Frida. Peru. 14 years living in the United States
Mariam. Barbados. 8 years living in the United States
Jorge. Peru. 13 years living in the United States
Karina. Uruguay. 15 years living in the United States
Maria. Argentina. 16 years living in the United States

    Maria arrived from Argentina 15 years ago with her husband and son after the economic crisis that affected their business and country in the early 2000s. She used to work at an Argentinian film school, and her husband as an architect. Here, she works as a domestic worker and her husband as a construction contractor. She is very active with the community as a volunteer organizer with United Families, and organization in Florida that looks to educate on keeping families with Undocumented members together.
Leticia. Uruguay. 15 years living in the United States
Carmen. Mexico. 8 years living in the United States
Teresa. Mexico. 26 years living in the United States 
Umberto. Mexico. 10 years living in the United States

    Umberto is a day laborer, he is a volunteer with the New Immigrant Community Empowerment, an organization dedicated to building the power and advancing the rights of immigrant workers in New York. After suffering at the hands of predatory and fraudulent employment agencies. Umberto and other NICE members formed a worker committee to address this problem, NICE members began to educate immigrant workers on their rights as consumers and meet with decision-makers and other community groups to come up with legislative solution. This led to the creation of the Justice for Job Seekers campaign, and was recently submitted as a bill and passed, providing fair and meaningful protections to low-wage immigrant workers as they look for work in the state of New York.
Carlos. Colombia. 15 years living in the United States

    Juan Carlos was born and raised in Colombia. Like many others from his country, he and his family had to flee due to threats of harm and kidnapping by guerilla soldiers. I met Juan Carlos while he was supporting and event of Florida Immigrant Coalition, while making his portrait, he told me that the house he was
living in, was actually a bird sanctuary.
Berta. Nicaragua. 13 years living in the United States
Yaquelin. Bolivia. 10 years living in the United States

    Yaqueline made her way to the United States from Bolivia 12 years ago. She is a domestic worker, activist and project director of Women Working Together USA.
Claudio. Chile. 14 years living in the United States

    Claudio is a member of SWER (Students Working for Equal Rights), he goes to college in order to study political science. He was protected under his parent’s visa, but when he turned 21 and became legally adult, his visa was canceled and now he could be eligible for deportation. His older brother was deported for the same reason. Claudio enjoys skateboarding and reading. The piece in yellow is an artwork created by Neck Face, a graffiti artist known for his frightening drawing style and humorous writings. Claudio won that piece at a skateboard competition.
Mariana. Venezuela. 14 years living in the United States

    Marianna came from Venezuela running from Chavez communism regime with her parents and sister almost 10 years ago. She started being active while fighting for the Dream Act that would give her a chance to not get deported and go to school in the United States. She got involved with SWER (Students Working for Equal Rights), an organization that fights for In-State tuition for undocumented students in the state of Florida.
Marisa. Argentina. 13 years living in the United States
Marisol. Mexico. 10 years living in the United States
Tonton. Haiti. 40 years living in the United States

    Ton Ton is the most senior Haitian master drummer in the United States. He teaches percussion in Florida youth crisis shelters. He still performs at art and cultural events with his apprentices showing the Caribbean traditions of drumming.
Arianna. Peru. 10 years living in the United States
Kelsey. Honduras. 13 years living in the United States
Saul. Mexico. 10 years living in the United States
Sofia. Panama. 7 years living in the United States

    Sofia is an undocumented transgender woman. She is a volunteer with the organization Survivor’s Pathway, where she attends in order to be of support for other victims of domestic violence and hate crimes specially targeted to undocumented women and transgender women around the city, state and country.

Sofia is a part time makeup artist and has a weakness for shoes, “Why do you like

shoes so much?” I asked upon meeting with her, “They make me feel good and special” she answered.